Uncertainty Shocks: Measuring the Implications for International Trade and Economic Growth

Monday, September 14, 2020

Uncertainty Shocks: Measuring the Implications for International Trade and Economic Growth

The COVID-19 pandemic, the United Kingdom’s Brexit journey, and the U.S.-China trade war have all contributed to greater uncertainty in international trade. How do we measure it? In the opening keynote for this webinar series, Dr. Nicholas Bloom discusses the World Uncertainty Index he co-created and what it can tell us about uncertainty shocks affecting international trade and prospects for global economic growth.

This webinar is part of a six-session series on “International Trade: Measuring and Managing Risk and Uncertainty.” The series is hosted by the Clayton Yeutter Institute of International Trade and Finance at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, with support from the CME Group Foundation. All webinars are free and open to the public. 

Resources:
Presentation Slides

Featuring
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Nicholas Bloom

Nicholas Bloom is the Eberle Professor of Economics at Stanford University and the co-Director of the National Bureau of Economic Research Productivity and Innovation program. He has a BA from Cambridge, MPhil from Oxford and PhD from University College London. Before Stanford he worked at McKinsey & Company and the UK Treasury. On the personal side he is English, living with his Scottish wife and American kids in a multi-accented house on Stanford campus. 

Moderator
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Jill O'Donnell
Jill O’Donnell is the director of the Clayton Yeutter Institute of International Trade and Finance and a professor of practice at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She leads the effort to build and grow the Yeutter Institute across its mission areas of education, research, and outreach. Her prior experience in the international relations and U.S. foreign policy arena spans Capitol Hill, international organizations, research entities, and the private sector. She is a graduate of Washington and Lee University and the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS).